Is composite bonding worth it?

Is composite bonding worth it?

Frequently asked questions about composite bonding

  1. What is composite bonding?
  2. Is composite bonding right for me?
  3. What is the difference between composite bonding and composite veneers?
  4. What are the risk or side effects involved in composite bonding?
  5. How long does composite bonding last?
  6. Is composite bonding reversible?
  7. How do I care for my composite bonding?
  8. How much does composite bonding cost?
  9. Does composite bonding whiten?

 

1. What is composite bonding?

Composite bonding is one of the easiest ways to treat different dental problems including chipped or cracked, decaying, discoloured teeth, spaces between teeth, or restoring lost teeth structure at a fraction of the cost of porcelain veneers.

Composite bonding involves applying and sculpting a tooth-coloured composite resin material to teeth and it is often done in one visit so you will get a same-day smile makeover. Although most dentist use these materials day to day, composite bonding is an art and each smile is customised to suit the patient. Highly skilled cosmetic dentists and clinicians will pay close attention to the finer details to carve out the desired smile enhancement.

It is a procedure that has been around for a long time but in recent years it has got more popular as people are looking toward minimally invasive dentistry for maximum aesthetics.

All in all, composite bonding or dental bonding is a perfect solution for solving minor dental imperfections.

2. Is composite bonding right for me?

Composite bonding is good for enhancing the shape, size and colour of your teeth. Composite bonding can treat a number of different situations such as the ones below:

  • Crooked or uneven teeth
  • Chipped teeth
  • Gappy teeth
  • Small teeth
  • Discoloured teeth
  • White spots on teeth

3. What is the difference between composite bonding and composite veneers?

Composite bonding, dental bonding, composite edge bonding, composite veneers are common names used interchangeably although there are slight differences. Composite refers to the material that is being used and this is a tooth coloured versatile resin. Composite bonding, dental bonding and composite edge bonding are when composite resin is used to cover part of the tooth whereas composite veneers cover the entire surface of the tooth. If covering only part of the tooth you need to choose a shade that is similar to the existing colour of the natural tooth. Composite veneers provide allows more scope to use a lighter shade and can camouflage more misshaped teeth.

4. What are the risks or side effects involved in composite bonding?

Composite dental bonding is a relatively risk-free dental procedure when done to a high standard as it is an additive procedure. The main things are that you follow the aftercare instructions for composite and as with any natural teeth, you will need to take good care to ensure you do not get decay or gum disease.

5. How long does composite bonding last?

Composite bonding generally lasts around 5 years with good care and regular maintenance. By following the composite aftercare instructions and visiting your dentist regularly they can last much longer. Someone who has a strong bite, grinds their teeth, has lots of staining food and drinks should expect their composite to chip and stain quicker. After a number of years, the composite may need a refresh and this can be done simply by selecting teeth that need attention and the composite can be resurfaced or replaced as necessary.

6. Is composite bonding reversible?

Composite bonding is pretty much reversible. When it is purely additive you can carefully remove the composite to restore back to the underlying tooth assuming there was no preparation required in the first instance.

7. How do I care for my composite bonding?

Always follow a good brushing regimen at home to take care of your teeth. Twice daily brushing with cleaning between your teeth is always the gold standard. Visit your dentist and hygienist twice a year to ensure your teeth and gums are in good condition and to polish the composite.

Be careful with eating very hard foods on the edges of your teeth and avoid bad habits such as finger nail-biting as it may cause the material to chip off. Composite forms a strong bond to the tooth but it is not as strong as your normal teeth. Be mindful of staining food and drinks such as curries, teas and coffees as these stains your teeth. Superficial stains can be polished, deep engrained stains may require replacement of the surface.

8. How much does composite bonding cost?

Since composite bonding is often a one to two-visit dental procedure (placement followed by review) it is often more affordable than other dental treatments such as porcelain veneers or ceramic veneers which often require two to four visits (preparation, trial smile, placement, review). Although you need to weigh up the pros and cons of each treatment option as porcelain or ceramic veneers may have a greater initial investment, they generally do last longer so may give you better value long term.

9. Does composite bonding whiten?

Composite bonding itself won’t whiten and so it is always best to make sure you are happy with the colour of your teeth before composite bonding is carried out. We would normally recommend you whiten your mile before you have any dental treatment on your front teeth. Whitening can sometimes help lift off superficial stains on your composite bonding. You can periodically top up your whitening to help ensure your natural teeth stay white.

 

If you would like more information about how composite bonding or composite veneers may help you improve your smile, please give us a call on 01772 335207 or fill out the contact form and we will be in touch.

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